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Term: Ice fog Class:  
 vernacular   (0%)
Created 6 June 2017
Last modified 6 June 2017
Contributed by GCW Glossary

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Definition: A type of fog composed of suspended particles of ice or ice crystals 20 to 100 microns resulting from the freezing of tiny supercooled water droplets. Ice fog occurs in clear, calm, stable air when temperatures are -30  CanadaNCA 

Suspension of numerous minute ice particles in the air, reducing the visibility at the Earth's surface.  WMOMeteoterm 

A suspension of numerous minute ice crystals in the air, reducing visibility at the earth's surface; the crystals often glitter in the sunshine; ice fog produces optical phenomena such as luminous pillars and small haloes.  NSIDCCryosphere 

(Also called ice-crystal fog, frozen fog, frost fog, frost flakes, air hoar, rime fog, pogonip.) A type of fog, composed of suspended particles of ice; partly ice crystals 20 to 100 micron in diameter, but chiefly (especially when dense) ice particles about 12  NOAA-NWS 

A type of fog, composed of suspended particles of ice, partly ice crystals 20 to 100 m in diameter, but chiefly, especially when dense, droxtals 12-20 m in diameter. It occurs at very low temperatures, and usually in clear, calm weather in high latitudes. The sun is usually visible and may cause halo phenomena. Ice fog is rare at temperatures warmer than -30C, and increases in frequency with decreasing temperature until it is almost always present at air temperatures of -45C in the vicinity of a source of water vapor. Such sources are the open water of fast-flowing streams or of the sea, herds of animals, volcanoes, and especially products of combustion for heating or propulsion. At temperatures warmer than -30C, these sources can cause steam fog of liquid water droplets, which may turn into ice fog when cooled ( see frost smoke). (Also called ice-crystal fog, frozen fog, frost fog, frost flakes, air hoar, rime fog, pogonip.)  AMSglossary 

A fog that is composed of small suspended ice crystals. Common in Arctic locations when temperatures are below -30 Celsius and a abundant supply of water vapor exists.  PhysicalGeography 

A suspension of numerous minute ice crystals in the air, reducing visibility at the earth's surface. The crystals often glitter in the sunshine. Ice fog produces optical phenomena such as luminous pillars and small haloes.  SPRI 

 GCW 
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