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Term: Icing Class:  
 vernacular   (0%)
Created 6 June 2017
Last modified 6 June 2017
Contributed by GCW Glossary

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Definition: A sheetlike mass of layered ice formed on the ground surface, or on river or lake ice, by freezing of successive flows of water that may seep from the ground, flow from a spring or emerge from below river or lake ice through fractures.  NSIDCCryosphere 

A coating of ice on a solid object.  NOAA-NWS 

Any deposit or coating of ice on an object caused by the impact of liquid hydrometeors, usually supercooled.  WMOMeteoterm 

A sheetlike mass of layered ice formed on the ground surface, or on river or lake ice, by freezing of successive flows of water that may seep from the ground, flow from a spring or emerge from below river or lake ice through fractures  IPAPermafrost 

A sheetlike mass of layered ice formed on the ground surface, or on river or lake ice, by freezing of successive flows of water that may seep from the ground, flow from a spring or emerge from below river or lake ice through fractures. Icings, also known as glaciation, may also occur in non-permafrost areas. In North America the term 'icing' is gradually replacing a variety of terms used in the past. Aufeis (German), flood ice, flood-plain icing, ice field, naled (Russian) and overflow ice usually indicated icings formed on river ice and floodplains. Chrystocrene (or crystocrene), ground icing, groundwater icing and spring icing usually indicated icings formed by freezing of ground-water discharge. Use of the term 'glacier' to describe icings, is inappropriate and should be avoided.  TrombottoGeocryology 

1. In general, any deposit or coating of ice on an object, caused by the impingement and freezing of liquid (usually supercooled) hydrometeors; to be distinguished from hoarfrost in that the latter results from the deposition of water vapor. The two basic types of icing are rime and glaze. See aircraft icing, carburetor icing. 2. A mass or sheet of ice formed during the winter by successive freezing of sheets of water that may seep from the ground, from a river, or from a spring. [Also known as flood icing, flooding ice, aufeis (German), naled (Russian).]  AMSglossary 

The accumulation of a deposit of ice on exposed objects, e.g. aircraft, ships, aerials, instruments. Icing may be produced by the deposition of water vapour or by the freezing on impact of droplets in the air (e.g. supercooled fog, cloud droplets, supercooled drizzle and rain, or, in the case of ships, sea spray or breaking waves).  SPRI 

 GCW 
Examples: