Term



0



[watch]
Term: Ogive Class:  
 vernacular   (0%)
Created 6 June 2017
Last modified 6 June 2017
Contributed by GCW Glossary

Permalink:
  n2t.net/ark:/99152/h2928

Definition: Arcuate bands or waves, convex downglacier, that develop in an icefall. Alternating light and dark bands are called banded ogives or Forbes bands. Each pair of bands, that is, one crest (light) and one trough (dark), represents a year's movement through the icefall. It can be shown that, to yield visible banding, ice must flow through the icefall in a time shorter than the duration of the ablation season or accumulation season. James Forbes was the first to describe ogives, in 1843.  IHPGlacierMassBalance 

An arcuate, convex, down-glacier-pointing band or undulation that forms on the surface of a glacier at the base of an icefall. Two types of ogives occur: wave ogives, which are undulations of varying height and band ogives, which are alternating light- and dark-colored bands.  USGSGlaciers(ambiguous) 

1. A band or wave on the surface of a valley glacier, stretching from side to side and arched in the direction of flow. 2. The graph of a cumulative frequency distribution.  AMSglossary 

Band or wave on the surface of a valley glacier, stretching from side to side and arched in the direction of flow.  SPRI 

Alternate bands of light and dark ice seen on a glacier surface.  NSIDCCryosphere 

Ogives are arc-shaped features occasionally found across the glacier surface below icefalls. They may be ridges and swales in the ice or bands of darker or lighter ice. One theory of their formation suggests that the ice is stretched and sometimes dirtied when exposed in the icefall during the high velocities of summer; it is compressed during the winter so that bands of different ice thickness form.  USGSGlaciers(ambiguous) 

Arcuate bands or waves, with their apices pointing down-glacier, that develop in an icefall. Alternating light and dark bands are called band ogives or Forbes bands. Each pair of bands, or one wave and trough, is believed to represent a year's movement through the icefall.  Swisseduc 

 GCW 
Examples: